No Man’s Sky

User avatar
Navid
Site Admin
Posts: 5696
Joined: 08 Aug 2007 20:30
Now Playing: Diablo, Bloodborne
Location: Norwich, UK

No Man’s Sky

Postby Navid » 10 Dec 2013 14:18

Image

No Man’s Sky trailer, first broadcast on December 7th as part of the Spike VGX awards, opens by stating that the game’s “every atom” is procedural. What follows shows a character emerging from an ocean full of fish, climbing inside a spaceship and flying into space in a single contiguous motion, interspersed with quick shots of different planet surfaces, gigantic space stations, space combat, deformable terrain and more.

It’s fantastic, and exciting, and it leaves you with no sense of what the game is. The trailer shows you just enough to suggest it might contain everything you can imagine. It’s the space game you always wanted, as far as you know. Luckily I had an advantage. When I first saw the trailer, it was a few days before the VGXs, and it was with the nervous, tired, excitable Hello Games development team. I spent two hours afterwards quizzing them about procedural generation, but also about what you actually do in No Man’s Sky.

Every player in No Man’s Sky will begin their life somewhere along the edge of a galaxy. Everything in the trailer takes place in a single solar system near the galaxy’s edge and, red grass aside, on Earth-like planets. “It helps to ground people and I think if we hadn’t shown that, people would go, ‘what the feck?’” Sean Murray, lead developer on No Man’s Sky, is choosing his words carefully. “It’s quite weird to see a thing that isn’t a fish, in the water. And so we have grounded the trailer in a particular solar system that kind of makes sense for people.”


Which suggests it’s not going to make sense later. The loose objective for players of No Man’s Sky is to head away from the edge and towards the galaxy’s centre. As you do, the planets you visit along the way become more mutated, more dangerous.

As you make your way towards the centre of the galaxy, the planets you pass are stepping stones along the way. You’ll land your ship on them and go hunting for resources. Those resources then, in some unexplained way, aid you in upgrading your ship and yourself. These upgrades allow you to travel larger distances, or maybe make you faster, or probably improve your guns. It’s still ambiguous.

The other reason we’re not seeing beyond these worlds is that Hello Games want No Man’s Sky to be about discovery. “What we wanted to get across was a sort of frontiersmanship, a sense of mystery and wonder. For me exploration is seeing something no one has seen before, and for your experience to be unique.”

This is also why the game is procedurally generated. At one point during the conversation, an odd, exciting question is raised: is No Man’s Sky the first game without a skybox? If you’re standing on a planet’s surface and look up, every single dot in the sky is an actual star you can go visit. If you see a tree three miles away, you can walk to it and find out what’s underneath it.

Exploration and resource gathering are the ways, really the only ways, in which the game is similar to Minecraft. The planets you land on aren’t cube-shaped and it’s unlikely you’ll build a house on them. They are the equivalent of Minecraft’s network of underground caves: exciting to find, unique to you, and full of materials which give them significance and value despite not being handcrafted.


Any planet you discover on your journey is marked on your galactic map, along with its name, its atmosphere and what resources you found there. If you choose to, you can then share that information with every other player, uploading it so that it’s shared across everyone’s galactic map.

You’ll get credit for discovering it. You’ll also, if the materials there are valuable, attract players to come visit. No Man’s Sky isn’t a multiplayer game, in as much as you’ll never see another player. But the galaxy is the same between everyone and actions of “significance” will be shared. If you kill a single bird, that won’t be shared. If you make an entire species of bird extinct, then those creatures will blink out of existence for everyone.

That means you might want to keep quiet about a planet of valuable resources, so others don’t come and deplete it. I also instantly start thinking of ways to be devious. Can I upload false information to the galactic map? Can I lure people to a system full of pirates and then, when their ships crash and burn, steal materials from their ghostly hulls?

When I ask these questions, Murray is light on specifics, but hopes players will work cooperatively. “There are some things that you could do for the wrong reasons. You could broadcast certain information for the wrong reasons. But generally people are playing together cooperatively to the benefit of everyone. You can be a Richard in the game if you want, but it has less point and less value.”

More at the link: http://www.rockpapershotgun.com/2013/12 ... -mans-sky/

By far the most interesting thing announced at the VGX, sounds incredibly ambitious (especially when considering the size of the dev team)... So far it's only announced for Pc but hopefully it'll make it's way to consoles as well down the line. Can't wait to hear and see more.

EDIT: Confirmed at E3 2014 to release on PS4. :)

User avatar
Waylander
Site Admin
Posts: 11578
Joined: 31 Jul 2007 20:21
Twitter ID: Waylander100
Now Playing: RotTR, Battlefield 1, SW: Battlefront
Location: Scotland

Re: No Man’s Sky

Postby Waylander » 10 Jun 2014 08:54

Confirmed for PS4 last night at Sony's E3 conference.
Hello Games' breathtaking sci-fi open universe game No Man's Sky will arrive for consoles first on PlayStation 4. Studio leader Sean Murray took the stage during Sony's E3 2014 press conference to make the announcement and reveal more gameplay from the game's procedurally-generated worlds.



Most impressive is the ability to hop from one planet to another with no loading times, from ground to space and back to ground on a different place in the solar system. Planets are populated by flora and fauna - big, dinosaur-looking creatures, floating jellyfish and beefy rhinos - while space features ship-based combat, with fleets of fighters appearing out of warp.

Source: http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2014- ... ystation-4

This look absolutely incredible! Visually & audibly stunning!! Procedurally generated so everyone's game will be unique. No two games will be the same! Very excited for this.

User avatar
Funar
Site Admin
Posts: 7355
Joined: 13 Aug 2007 10:58
Twitter ID: @PSLFunar
Now Playing: Destiny, Destiny

Re: No Man’s Sky (PS4)

Postby Funar » 10 Jun 2014 10:56

Pull back your joysticks you filthy non-inverters. This one is going to be freaking awesome!! Looks like another game with Elite roots but even better than Drifter. Really nice :cool:

User avatar
Navid
Site Admin
Posts: 5696
Joined: 08 Aug 2007 20:30
Now Playing: Diablo, Bloodborne
Location: Norwich, UK

Re: No Man’s Sky

Postby Navid » 11 Jun 2014 11:57

Stage demo with a bit more info on story, gameplay and multiplayer:



User avatar
Funar
Site Admin
Posts: 7355
Joined: 13 Aug 2007 10:58
Twitter ID: @PSLFunar
Now Playing: Destiny, Destiny

Re: No Man’s Sky

Postby Funar » 11 Jun 2014 12:14

Really liked the nod to Elite at 1:30 on the second video. It would have annoyed me if they had not made some reference or link to this iconic game and one that became quite important to me. Happy chappy :welldone:

EDIT: also a nice nod to Journey and multiplayer about 14:30 in the first one. And lol @ massive penis monsters near the end.

User avatar
Funar
Site Admin
Posts: 7355
Joined: 13 Aug 2007 10:58
Twitter ID: @PSLFunar
Now Playing: Destiny, Destiny

Re: No Man’s Sky

Postby Funar » 12 Jun 2014 10:41

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-27807167

E3: How No Man's Sky took on the games industry - and won

No flashing lights, no pounding music, no booth babes.

But boy, has it stolen the show.

Its game, No Man's Sky - an "open world" science -fiction game title - has arguably generated more buzz than any other title on show here in Los Angeles.

Shown on-screen as part of Sony's PlayStation press conference earlier this week, it had the audience cheering - and other developers looking on with envy.

Because unlike the other titles lavished with that kind of attention, this isn't a game created by hundreds of people for millions of dollars.

Rather, No Man's Sky began its life in a makeshift office above a tile shop in Guildford, a town just outside London.

"It's absolutely insane," laughs Sean Murray, Hello Games' co-founder, in an interview with the BBC.

"We were on stage for about five or six minutes. Pretty much the only other people who got that were teams of hundreds. Hello Games in total is 10 people, with just a handful working on No Man's Sky."


EDIT: Sean Murray @NoMansSky tweets about the above BBC article :-

"See Mum, I told you I have a real job."



lol

User avatar
Funar
Site Admin
Posts: 7355
Joined: 13 Aug 2007 10:58
Twitter ID: @PSLFunar
Now Playing: Destiny, Destiny

Re: No Man’s Sky

Postby Funar » 12 Jun 2014 10:58


User avatar
Keyop
Site Admin
Posts: 12971
Joined: 31 Jul 2007 15:50
Now Playing: Star Wars Battlefront
Battlefield 1

Re: No Man’s Sky

Postby Keyop » 14 Jun 2014 20:01

This looks great :)

Dunk
Legend
Posts: 424
Joined: 17 May 2010 08:30
Now Playing: nhl 10
dirt 2
modnation racers
modern warfare 2

Re: No Man’s Sky

Postby Dunk » 01 Jul 2014 20:45

A new article from the verge about this, definitely one to watch for me.

Summon up every great space-exploration fantasy of the past century — from mining exotic planets in uncharted space to watching attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion — and convert that compendium of awesome into a game of unprecedented size and scale. That, in rough terms, is the motivation behind No Man’s Sky. This game doesn’t just aim for the moon or the stars; it wants to deliver an infinite universe filled with all types of celestial bodies and an endless variety of possible adventures. It’s one of the most ambitious projects in gaming today and it’s being created by a 10-person team working next door to a taxi company.

Founded in 2008 by a group of four friends leaving big game companies, Hello Games enjoyed success with its first title, 2010’s Joe Danger, before being thrust into the E3 spotlight this year with a gameplay demo of the refreshingly original No Man’s Sky. In a show overrun by predictable sequels and violent antics, its more peaceful exploration stirred up widespread acclaim and anticipation. This past week, fresh off his appearance on gaming’s biggest stage, Hello Games founder Sean Murray sat down with me to discuss the unique universe his company is trying to build and the challenge of doing so with a team small enough to fit into a single room. Plus, he let me try it out for myself.

"Games are incredibly bad at making the rare feel rare," says Murray. "Call of Duty is so worried about you not seeing an explosion every 15 seconds, that there’s never a quiet moment, there’s never a buildup. We’ve lost that ability to have even a feeling of ‘am I going the right way’ that we’re quite used to from real life."

No Man’s Sky spurns the conventional structures of pre-written narratives, set-piece action sequences, and discrete levels. There are no quests in this game. You don’t go planet-hopping to find a damsel or a merchant in distress and then fetch them three healing salves and four wolf pelts of varying colors. In fact, at the outset, you can’t hop very far at all. Each player is handed only the bare necessities for survival, dropped onto a planet on the rim of a galaxy, and left to his or her own devices. A basic life pod will putter you up to the nearest space station where you can begin to figure out how to get such devices, upgrade them, and do something useful or interesting with your life. Most people will start by either mining resources or trying their luck as a bounty hunter or freight security guard. What career paths lie beyond those basic professions is part of the exploration you’ll have to do.

Having to come up with your own objectives and measures for success will be a bewildering premise for a generation of players habituated to receiving explicit directions followed by a pat on the back for every small achievement in a game. Mario jumps and a shiny gold coin pops into the air. The only thing that happens in No Man’s Sky when you jump is that you land back down. Manually piloting your spaceship from the ground to the nearest space station isn’t just the scenic route to leaving the planetary surface, it’s the only way into space. There’s a pervasive insistence on the plausible realism of space exploration that distinguishes this game from most in its genre.

A single universe will be shared by all players of No Man’s Sky, though they’ll be so distant from one another that coming across some other player-controlled spaceship will feel like a truly noteworthy event. As Murray explains, "people underestimate how vast our (in-game) universe is. If we were lucky enough to have a million players and started them all on one planet, they would still be really far apart." So the enormous cluster battles of EVE Online are unlikely to ever materialize in No Man's Sky.

The other name that No Man’s Sky inevitably brings to mind is Spore, the genre-bending game from SimCity creator Will Wright that first introduced procedurally generated games — which dynamically create their worlds through algorithms rather than human design — to the mainstream. Murray describes that Maxis title as a millstone around his neck that gave games like the one he is building a bad name. It made everything fantastical. Every planet was lush, with a thriving ecosystem of spectacular and weird creatures. That’s what the trailer for No Man’s Sky depicts too — with fluorescent dinosaurs grazing alongside space antelopes — but Murray says that will be a very uncommon sight in his game.

Image Image

The developers have set themselves a 90–10 rule. 90 percent of all the planets will not be habitable and won’t have any life on them. Of the 10 percent that do, 90 percent of that life will be primitive and boring. The tiny fraction of garden worlds with more evolved life forms on them will thus be almost as rare in the game universe as they ought to be in the real one. This scarcity is part of the delicate balance that Hello Games is trying to strike between its idealistic commitment to the science of sci-fi and the inherent need to keep players entertained.

This is, after all, still a game, and there are a number of subversive ways in which players are nudged to keep going and exploring. While you can’t level up your hero, you can equip him or her with a jetpack to make those gravity-bound jumps last longer or buy a hyper drive to allow for interstellar travel. There’s an infinite diversity of spaceships you can obtain in the game, but you can’t build them yourself and can only buy the ones docked at space stations. To find the perfect one, you might well have to leave your solar system and see what else is out there.

Ultimately, whether acting as a peaceful trader or a marauding raider, every explorer begins to get drawn in to the center of the universe. Riskier and more lucrative opportunities await travelers of all creeds. Effective cooperation, says Murray, will then be important to achieving each individual’s goals. "The reality is we don’t know what people will do — will they create spokes of a wheel where they cooperate to try and get to the center, or will it be totally chaotic and everyone will go off in different directions?" The crowd dynamics of No Man’s Sky are as excitingly unknowable as the vast expanses of its universe. And Hello Games is as curious to find out where it all leads as the rest of us, with Murray admitting that "we don’t actually know everything that’s out there in this universe we are creating."

Hello Games works around the innate conflict between the scale of its new game and the small size of the team building it by using procedural generation. As Murray puts it, the heart of this game is "a big black box full of math that generates everything on the fly." Instead of having an artist draw every in-game asset or landscape, No Man’s Sky uses a library of base prototypes, randomizes their parameters along a set of rules for internal coherence, and produces a form of organized, infinitely diverse chaos. Those rules are crucial to making the universe believable, and the color, size, geology, and even moisture of each planet will be affected by its distance and relation to the nearest star.

No Man’s Sky already has the skeletal structure to be a cosmically sized playground that we all can share in. The game’s still in development, however, and numerous questions remain to be answered. There are buildings visible on some planets, but how much can the player build? And, on the other side of the same coin, how much will you be able to destroy? A Han Solo simulator can’t be complete without the possibility of a dimpled Death Star to fight against.

Or maybe it can. Sean Murray isn’t ready to promise anything he’s not certain he can deliver in the final game, but he’s okay with it seeming to lack features and options when it’s released. He sees a trend — borne of the success of open-world games like Minecraft and the buggy but beloved DayZ — that shows people actively engaging with games before they are complete so as to provide their input and participate in their creation. Some gamers prefer to invent their own meaning and purpose, and No Man’s Sky wants to be the most epic canvas for their expression. Where the game’s development goes, what criteria are used to determine success within it, and the ultimate reason for its existence are all things that the players themselves will have to figure out.

Finally, before concluding my visit to the Hello Games studio, I was handed a PS4 controller and allowed to take my own tour of No Man’s Sky. Exploring the colorful planet from the company’s demo reel, I scanned a mossy cave for resources, scared away a few deer scampering about bright-orange underbrush, and got carried away with my jetpack. There wasn’t any point to it other than sheer curiosity, but nothing more was needed. The dreamy sci-fi ambience made the experience of exploring rewarding enough by itself. No Man’s Sky is not a game that you can win or lose, but it certainly won me over at the first attempt. Look for it on PC and the PS4 at an appropriately indeterminate point in the unexplored future.

Source: The Verge

User avatar
Keyop
Site Admin
Posts: 12971
Joined: 31 Jul 2007 15:50
Now Playing: Star Wars Battlefront
Battlefield 1

Re: No Man’s Sky

Postby Keyop » 02 Jul 2014 05:12

Looking forward to finding out more and more as this nears release. Not been an 'explore-em-up' of this scale for a long time.